Dorin

The strange case of Facebook censoring people protesting a corrupt government

The strangest thing happened yesterday, during the biggest mass protests against the corrupt government in Romania. One of the most well known online personalities, a prolific local vlogger, Marian Ionescu, has seen his Facebook account reported for spamming, and was unable to post on his profile, to tell his friends about his participation to the protests. See the story on his site (Romanian) He was not alone – in fact, hundreds others have seen their accounts marked as spamming, although all they did was post about their participation in the protests.
Dorin

Some interesting articles on gaming

Because I know I neglected the gaming section, let me get back here for a bit. I have a few articles on gaming that I read recently and I really liked: Ian Bogost, co-founder of Persuasive Games, an independent game shop, writes about the rationale behind Cow Clicker, an ironic Facebook game. I truly hate Facebook games, and they seem to make more and more of them. I was thinking recently that people expect games to be free, like the Facebook games are, and therefore, there’s no investment in quality and optimization.
Dorin

C++ comeback?

I recommend this talk of Herb Sutter, held at the opening of the C++ and beyond conferences. It about why a resuscitation of native code is happening right now, and why the C++ comes at the perfect time. Thinking about Microsoft’s Channel9 that rebooted the ‘native code’ broadcasts, if we think about Google releasing the Native Interface for Android and for the Google Chrome browser (See NaCl), I’d say it’s at least an interesting talk, and I can start seeing a context of C++ growing instead of shrinking.
Dorin

The three technological wars

From what I read, lately the news is not about about technological advancements; not about the new way of doing things, about faster, bigger, better – but in the last month, only two types of news hit the streets: „hackers do this and that” and „apple/microsoft/samsung/google/whoever owns god-knows-what patents”. But there is another unheard war that we should all be aware of, because sooner or later it will affect our lives and it will modify the way we see the Internet, for good.
Dorin

Yate in the news

I know from some time now the guys behind Yate: and finally, they hit the news. After some time now, none other but Google finally made public their partnership on the Jingle, open VOIP protocol. Some cool things about Yate: They are Romanian, from Bucharest. They work on the best Voice over IP engine in the world. Their code can be used to learn C++ – really, it’s very well written 🙂 Congratulations, and good luck onwards!
Dorin

LulzSec’s 50 days of mayhem

Now that LulzSec announced that its days of mayhem are over (hint, they probably are not, but they have to lay low for a while), let’s see what we’ve learned from these last 50 days. We’re not safe. We never were, but we’re definitely less safe now, that we rely more and more on the Internet, we need to choose our providers very carefully. The only safe computer nowadays is one that is shut down and has no connection to internet (yes, there is such a thing as ‘wake on LAN’).
Dorin

The story of the Pacman Doodle

Raul just forwarded me this link, and for 75 minutes I was glued to the screen. In a fascinating presentation, two engineers from Google explain how the Pacman Doodle was created. For me it was fascinating for many reasons. I admire the presentation – I was really impressed by the way they prepared their presentation, how they ‘executed’ it, and how well it worked – even the glitches in the presentation seemed well integrated I admire how those guys were able to do that with the tools at hand.
Dorin

Microsoft improves Skype

In an unexpected move, Microsoft started improving Skype and their infrastructure: Or, maybe, they really needed a coffee break after some sexy conversations some people had over skype. I guess we will never know…
Dorin

Kernel 3.0? 2011.0?

In a summary announcement, it seems that Linus Torvalds wants to get over the 2.6 numbering, and jump to a different value. 3.0 sounds round, now that Linux is entering it’s third decade of development (21 years already?) 2.6 was indeed a quite sturdy branch – I remember the times with 2.4 and 2.5, with 2.5 catching all the cool features, and I thank god that those times are over. Backporting drivers was never fun, and it’s cool to see that there are now a lot more stable installments of Linux.
Dorin

An explanation for Mac corporate sales rise

Apple announced with pride that they outsold the PC market for enterprise – their sales rose 66% while the market rose only 4.5%. And while they were very discreet on real figures, and disclosed only percentages, the Apple fanboys and girls are already thinking that (and I quote) ****The more people exposed to Apple products and Macs in particular, the more this will snowball. The genie’s out of the bottle and he’s wearing a halo!