K Code Parser (story 1)

I’m gonna update the blog about the advance in my project in stories. I don’t know how many stories I will have, nor will I bother to name them (unless they are tremendously interesting, like this one is not).

So first story is how difficult is to have SVN on eclipse, and make it work. It’s not that I cannot find my way without Eclipse. It’s that I want to learn how to use the damned thing from Eclipse – after all, it IS an Integrated Development Environment.

So we want to install some plugin for SVN. Easy. We go in Help->Install new software (always loved to do that) and we search for SVN. Wait for about 1 minute before deciding not to use the task manager to close eclipse, select first Subversive SVN connectors. Amaze yourself with the fact that it doesn’t work. Try again, selecting from the window stuff that might work. Try again, again and once again. When you have a ‘Next button’ on the second page (no errors, then) press it. Don’t think twice. Don’t mind what’s installing. I don’t know, and you don’t know. Eclipse knows. Restart Eclipse. Notice that it doesn’t work. Try again. Don’t succeede. Write an angry post on how it’s friggin’ incredible this piece of sh**.

Then relax, and try again

Comments

K Code Parser (story 1) — 2 Comments

  1. SVN is old school. Use Git or something else on the same lines (Mercurial, Darcs). Of course, if it's an open source project you are forced to one SCV. But if it's a startup, use Git. You'll thank yourself later 🙂

    Also, don't try to depend too much on the IDE. If you're on Windows you can use Tortoise, if on Linux you can use the command line. It will work better.

  2. Mercurial. Just switched to it.

    I'm not trying to depend on the IDE but I'm trying to get the hang of it. Trying to see what it should work like. You never know when you gonna need that knowledge.

    Day one with Eclipse+SVN sucks. On the other hand, Mercurial seems to work quite fine.